BLOG

PHOENIX ACCIDENT ATTORNEY DISCUSSES GIVING RECORDED STATEMENTS

Phoenix Accident Attorney Nick Alcock has some concrete advice for those about to give a recorded statement to an insurance company. Recorded statements are usually telephone interviews conducted by the insurance company after a car crash. Insurance adjusters look to see if there are any issues in the crash that can allow them to deny or possibly devalue the claim. Accident attorney Alcock says, “Talk to a lawyer first before you give a recorded statement to any insurance company. You would be surprised the tactics that some insurance companies use to trick people into saying things that can later be used against them.” Would insurance companies really try to make you put your foot in your mouth? “Absolutely,” says Alcock, “There are a number of little tricks that interviewers use to put the issue of liability into question. If they can figure out a way to deny your claim, they probably will try.”

For auto accident cases, Alcock advises to speak with an attorney before giving any recorded statement. Insurance companies may try to get a driver to admit that they were at least partially responsible for the accident. The may insinuate that you weren’t paying full attention or that there was some distraction that lead to the accident. Personal Injury Lawyer Nick Alcock has seen it all. “Most insurance companies are honest and ethical, but let’s be honest ourselves, if the companies can save a dime by injecting a bit of doubt as to why the auto accident occurred they probably will.”

So what should you do? Alcock has some advice that anyone should consider. “Don’t expect the insurance adjuster to be on your side. Obviously if you are going to make a recorded statement, you have to be truthful. But on the other hand, you don’t have to be bullied or pressured into agreeing to what the adjuster wants you to agree with. Keep your guard up and be prepared for anything.”

Insurance companies may use recorded statements to assess a plaintiffs demeanor and general likability. If your case doesn’t settle, then you may have to testify in trial. Insurance companies want to know how you would come across on the witness stand. Says injury lawyer Alcock, “They will look to see how sympathetic you will appear to a bunch of strangers on a jury. They want to know your education level and your ability to communicate what happened. If you are argumentative or nasty with the insurance companies, it may bite you later. Insurance companies are scared of “put together” plaintiffs that can make a jury feel for their situation. If you sound unlikable, this can really affect the insurance companies settlement offer.”

The best piece of advice, according to attorney Alcock, is speak with a lawyer prior to giving a recorded statement. “It’s good to do a dry run with an attorney so that you are prepared for the recorded statement. There’s nothing wrong with having an attorney listen to what happened and make sure that you can clearly and accurately depict how the accident unfolded. The more clear and concise you are, the better it is for you.”

If you need to speak with an experienced personal injury attorney, call the law firm of Alcock and Associates. You can speak with an attorney over the phone who can give you some insight as to how the system works. Please be aware that you may have to give a recorded statement to your own insurance company. You do not necessarily have to give a recorded statement to the at fault driver’s insurance policy. An attorney can help you make the decision. Please do not rely on this blog to decide whether or not to give a recorded statement. Their number is 602-989-5000.